Tapeworm Drug Inhibits Colon Cancer Metastasis

The results are reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Plans are already underway with Professor Peter M. Schlag (Charite Comprehensive Cancer Center) to conduct a clinical trial. Colon cancer is one of the most common tumor diseases in Western countries. In Germany alone, there are approximated 73 000 new cases of the disease every year. Despite surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, only about half of the affected patients are cured. The reason is that around 20 percent of the colon cancer patients already have metastases at diagnosis and in about one third of the patients, metastasis occurs despite successful initial treatment. Of these patients with metastatic colon cancer, the five-year survival rate is only about 10 percent. By contrast, for nonmetastatic colon cancer patients the survival rate is 90 percent. Scientists have known for several years that the gene S100A4/metastasin can initiate colon cancer metastasis. Five years ago Professor Stein, working together with Professor Schlag and Professor Walter Birchmeier (MDC), showed how this gene is regulated. They found that the beta-catenin gene, when mutant, activates this S100A4/metastasin gene, thus triggering colon cancer metastasis. Beta-catenin normally regulates cellular adhesion. The scientists looked for compounds that block the expression of the metastasin gene.

continue http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110617164128.htm

Tapeworm drug inhibits colon cancer metastasis

Colon cancer is one of the most common tumor diseases in Western countries. In Germany alone, there are approximated 73 000 new cases of the disease every year. Despite surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, only about half of the affected patients are cured. The reason is that around 20 percent of the colon cancer patients already have metastases at diagnosis and in about one third of the patients, metastasis occurs despite successful initial treatment. Of these patients with metastatic colon cancer, the five-year survival rate is only about 10 percent. By contrast, for nonmetastatic colon cancer patients the survival rate is 90 percent. Scientists have known for several years that the gene S100A4/metastasin can initiate colon cancer metastasis. Five years ago Professor Stein, working together with Professor Schlag and Professor Walter Birchmeier (MDC), showed how this gene is regulated. They found that the beta-catenin gene, when mutant, activates this S100A4/metastasin gene, thus triggering colon cancer metastasis. Beta-catenin normally regulates cellular adhesion. The scientists looked for compounds that block the expression of the metastasin gene. They screened 1280 compounds and found what they were looking for: niclosamide, a drug until now approved for use to treat intestinal parasite infections from tapeworms. Surprisingly, the researchers discovered that niclosamide inhibits the beta catenin-driven expression of the S100A4/metastasin gene, both in the cell culture and in mice. The animals had fewer metastases. Next, the researchers want to conduct clinical trials to find out whether the compound is also effective in patients with metastasizing colon cancer. ### *Novel Effect of Antihelminthic Niclosamide on S100A4-Mediated Metastatic Progression in Colon Cancer Ulrike Sack, Wolfgang Walther, Dominic Scuiero, Mike Selby, Dennis Kobelt, Margit Lemm, Iduna Fichtner, Peter M.

have a peek at these guys http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-06/haog-tdi061711.php

Soy Protein may Reduce Colon Cancer Metastasis

Heavy Coffee Consumption Linked to Early Death

That led the scientists to do this study in which they experimented with oral doses of the peptide. “After all, soy is a food, and we wanted the animals to consume it as a food. Because this lunasin would be digested, we needed to figure out how much should be fed to achieve the desired concentration in the bloodstream,” de Mejia said. Using mice that had been injected with human colon cancer cells, the scientists began by feeding the animals 8 mg/kg of lunasin daily, which reduced the number of new tumors in the liver by 55 percent. They increased the dose five times, at last achieving a 94 percent reduction in tumors at 20 mg/kg of lunasin. “We were very impressed by the reduction, but the results were short of statistical significance from the control group. More animals are needed to strengthen the power of the analysis. It’s a small study but very promising,” de Mejia said. The scientists plan to repeat the study again using 30 mg/kg of lunasin as soon as they can obtain funding. “One tumor is still too many. We’d like to see no tumors,” she said. The scientists said that consuming the equivalent of 20 to 30 mg/kg of lunasin in soy foods would be daunting in terms of number of servings per day. “But it would certainly be possible if food companies began to offer lunasin-enriched soy milk or yogurt,” she said, noting that lunasin-enriched flour is already on the market. De Mejia said that chronic daily exposure to lunasin could make an even bigger difference in terms of cancer development and metastasis. “These animals were acutely exposed to the peptide for only 28 days, and we still achieved these results.” There is evidence that lunasin accumulates in the body tissues, most notably the livers, of animals that have experienced chronic exposure to this bioactive component of soy. “Consuming soy protein regularly in the diet could be important not only for nutrition but also for cancer prevention,” she said.

that guy http://www.medindia.net/news/soy-protein-may-reduce-colon-cancer-metastasis-121721-1.htm

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