Eating Fish May Help Ward Off Colon Polyps In Women

Colon Polyps More Common in Hispanic Men Than Women

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Colon polyps are small growths on the intestinal lining that may develop into cancer. Previous research has suggested a link between inflammation and formation of colon polyps. Omega-3 fats in fish may reduce inflammation and help protect against the development of colon polyps, according to the researchers at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center in Nashville, Tenn.. Their study of more than 5,300 people found that women who ate at least three servings of fish a week were 33 percent less likely to develop colon polyps, and also had lower levels of an inflammation-related hormone called prostaglandin E2. “That was the aspect of the study we were particularly excited about because prostaglandin E2 is known to be associated with adenomas or polyps in colorectal cancers,” first author Dr. Harvey Murff, an associate professor of medicine, said in a Vanderbilt University Medical Center news release. Fish oil appears to have the same beneficial effect as aspirin in reducing inflammation, he said. The researchers were surprised to find that eating fish reduced the risk of colon polyps in women, but not in men. “The difference between men and women may be linked to their background diet. Even though men are eating more omega-3 fatty acids they may also be eating more omega-6 fatty acids and that may be blunting the effect,” Murff said. Omega-6 fatty acids are found in meats, grains and seed oils, including corn oil. Types of fish with high levels of the protective omega-3 fatty acids include tuna, salmon and sardines.

this review http://health.usnews.com/health-news/news/articles/2012/02/17/eating-fish-may-help-ward-off-colon-polyps-in-women

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In white patients, polyps are typically found on the left side of the colon. This difference may result from underlying molecular differences in the two patient groups, said study author Dr. Marcia Cruz-Correa, an associate professor of medicine and biochemistry at the University of Puerto Rico Cancer Center. The finding about polyp location is important because it highlights the need to use colonoscopy when conducting colorectal cancer screening in Hispanics. This is the most effective method of detecting polyps on the right side of the colon. The study was to be presented Sunday at the Digestive Diseases Week meeting in New Orleans. “Colorectal cancer screening rates among Hispanics are dangerously low. Currently only 40% get screened despite the fact that colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death among Hispanic women. As Hispanics become more acculturated to the U.S. lifestyle, they are losing the protective factor of their diet, which may account for the higher rates of colorectal cancer seen in U.S. Hispanics compared to the expected rates of cancer in their country of origin,” Cruz-Correa said.

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Too Much Sitting Tied to Higher Risk of Colon Polyps in Men

| Rectal | Exercise / Misc. | Men’s Problems / Misc. Posted: Monday, October 28, 2013, 12:00 PM MONDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) — Men who are more sedentary face a higher risk of recurring colon polyps, according to a new study, even if these men break up their downtime with bouts of recreational activities such as walking, jogging or golf. This suggests that extended inactivity is itself a risk factor for noncancerous colon polyps, benign tumors that can give rise to colorectal cancer, the researchers said. Known as “colorectal adenomas,” these polyps typically can be removed after being identified during a colorectal cancer screening, such as a colonoscopy. The recurrence of such polyps, however, seems to be greater among men (but not women) who are relatively less active. The researchers looked at activity levels among more than 1,700 men and women, and found that the more leisurely the men’s lifestyle, the greater their risk for precancerous polyps. Men who spent 11 or more hours a day in seated endeavors — such as writing or reading — were 45 percent more likely to develop polyps than those who spent less than seven hours a day engaged in sedentary behavior. The study, funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the U.S. National Cancer Institute, was schedule for presentation this week at the annual cancer-prevention conference of the American Association for Cancer Research, held in Oxon Hill, Md.

more useful things http://www.philly.com/philly/health/menshealth/HealthDay681440_20131028_Too_Much_Sitting_Tied_to_Higher_Risk_of_Colon_Polyps_in_Men.html

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