Heavy People More Likely To Have Colon Polyps: Study

Previous studies have made the connection between obesity and colon cancer, a link recognized by the US National Cancer Institute. But the current study, which appeared in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, is the first to point to a higher risk of colon polyps – also known as adenomas – in heavy people. “Because there is a known association between obesity and cancer, there is a logical extension to expect a connection between obesity and the step before cancer, which is adenoma,”said Hutan Ashrafian from Imperial College, London, who co-authored the study. Ashrafian and his colleagues analyzed data from 23 studies involving more than 100,000 people across the United States, Asia and Europe, looking at the relationship between polyps and body mass index, or BMI, a measure of weight relative to height. All the studies followed World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines that define people with a BMI over 25 as overweight and above 30 as obese. In most studies, polyps were identified during colonoscopy procedures while two large studies used self-reported questionnaires. Overall, researchers found that 22 per cent of overweight and obese people had colon polyps, compared to 19 per cent in people of normal weight. The polyp risk grew with increasing BMI. “The findings suggest that obesity may be having an effect (on cancer development) much earlier than we thought,” said Ashrafian, who with his fellow authors recommended timely colon cancer screening for overweight and obese people. The findings couldn’t say whether obesity causes polyps by itself, but if it does, that may be bad news for a world where obesity is on the rise. According to the World Health Organization, about 500 million people worldwide are obese. Colon cancer killed more than half a million people worldwide in 2008, WHO figures show. Publication:

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Aramis Ramirez has polyp removed from colon

Jones threw a bullpen session at 80 percent effort on Sunday and stepped up his intensity in another mound workout on Wednesday. He should be 100 percent for the start of the 2014 regular season and is the favorite right now to take over as the White Sox closer. Carl Pavano retires from baseball at age 38 Carl Pavano has retired from professional baseball. Pavano’s agent shared that news Wednesday with Jeff Todd of MLB Trade Rumors. “Despite my strong desire to compete and hard work in preparing for the upcoming season,” the 38-year-old right-hander said in a statement, “I feel that the amount of time lost from my spleen injury, coupled with the recovery from my complications from that injury, preclude me from continuing to compete at my highest level, which is necessary to perform in the major leagues.” He registered a 4.39 career ERA in 14 big league seasons. Red Sox not actively engaged with SS Drew According to WEEI’s Alex Speier, the Red Sox are not engaged in active discussions with Stephen Drew. Both the Cactus League and Grapefruit League got underway on Wednesday, and yet Drew remains unsigned. He’s struggling to attract offers because his free agency is tied to draft pick compensation and there’s been talk of him waiting until the early part of the summer to settle on a landing spot. Nelson Cruz, who was also tied to draft pick compensation, recently agreed to a one-year, $8 million deal with the Orioles. Machado (knee) to have checkup on March 18 Manny Machado (knee) is tentatively scheduled to have a follow-up exam with his surgeon Dr. Neal ElAttrache on March 18.

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Colorectal Cancer,metastatic Or Recurrent – Topic Overview

Colorectal Cancer Metastasis Sites

Blood in your stool or very dark stools. A change in your bowel habits, such as more frequent stools, thinner stools, or a feeling that your bowels are not emptying completely. Loss of appetite. Constant tiredness ( fatigue ). If your cancer has spread, you may have other symptoms, depending on where the cancer is. If it has spread to: The lymph nodes of your belly, it may cause bloating , a swollen belly, loss of appetite, or a feeling of fullness. The liver, it may cause pain on the upper right side of your belly, bloating, loss of appetite, or a feeling of fullness. The lungs, it may cause you to cough, spit up blood, or have a hard time breathing. The bones, it may cause bone pain, especially in your back, hips, and pelvis. The brain , it may cause problems with memory, concentration, balance, or movement. How is metastatic or recurrent colorectal cancer diagnosed? Colon or rectal cancer that has spread or returned is diagnosed using a physical exam and several tests, including blood tests, chest X-rays, bone scans , ultrasounds, and CT , PET , or MRI scans. The diagnosis is usually confirmed with a biopsy .

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According to the American Cancer Society, colon or rectal cancer accounted for almost 150,000 new diagnoses and almost 50,000 deaths in the United States in 2009. These cancers develop when cells acquire genetic mutations that allow the cells to proliferate uncontrollably and indefinitely, evading cell death mechanisms. Cancer cells also have the ability to metatasize–travel from the initial primary tumor throughout the body, forming secondary tumors in other tissues. Colorectal cancer cells most commonly metastasize to a few regions throughout the body, leading to a range of potentially fatal symptoms. Liver Colorectal cancer most commonly metatasizes to the liver, the organ responsible for detoxifying the body. In a 2006 study published in “Cancer Control,” Dr. J. McLoughlin reported that around 50 percent of colorectal cancer patients developed secondary tumors in the liver. Common metastasis to the liver is thought to be due to the path of blood flow from the colon, which facilitates migration of cancer cells from the colon to the liver. Metatasis to the liver can lead to a number of potentially fatal side effects. As a secondary tumor grows within the liver, the neighboring regions of the organ have difficulty functioning. As the liver begins to fail, patients will often experience a loss of appetite and weight loss. In later stages of metastasis, patients may experience jaundice, a yellowing of the skin, which indicates that the liver is shutting down. Early detection of liver metastasis is required to treat the cancer. You Might Also Like

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Risk Factors For Colorectal Cancer

Personal history. Research shows that women who have a history of ovarian, uterine, or breast cancer have a somewhat higher risk of developing colorectal cancer. A person who already has had colorectal cancer may develop the disease a second time, especially if the first disease was diagnosed before the age of 60. In addition, people who have chronic inflammatory conditions of the colon, such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease , are at higher risk of developing colorectal cancer. Family history. Parents, siblings, and children of a person who has had colorectal cancer are more likely to develop colorectal cancer themselves. If two or more family members have had colorectal cancer, the risk increases to about 20%.A family history of familial adenomatous polyposis, MYH associated polyposis, or hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer, (HNPCC), increases the risk of colon cancer development. HNPCC also increases the risk for other cancers . Diet. A diet high in fat and cholesterol and low in fiber has been linked to a greater risk of developing colorectal cancer. Lifestyle factors. You may be at increased risk for developing colorectal cancer if you drink alcohol, smoke, don’t get enough exercise, and if you are overweight. Diabetes. People with diabetes have a 30% to 40% increased risk of developing colon cancer. Race. The highest incidence of colorectal cancer is in African-American men and women.

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Latest research examines colorectal cancer risk factors

Worldwide, colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer in women and the third most common in men. Studies found that patients prefer colonscopy over computed tomography colonography, despite the former’s more invasive nature, and highlight the importance of a patient’s experience and role in the process of colonoscopy. Other research assesses the benefits of colorectal cancer screening for the elderly and persons with type II diabetes, and indicates a prevalence rate for pre-cancerous adenoma (benign tumor or polyp) that is higher than previously thought. “These findings could affect thinking about who should be screened for colorectal cancer and how, as well as when,” said John Petrini, MD, FASGE, FACP, Sansum Clinic, Santa Barbara, CA. “Findings like these are critically important since early detection is the key to reducing colorectal cancer deaths.” DDW is the largest international gathering of physicians and researchers in the field of gastroenterology, hepatology, endoscopy and gastrointestinal surgery. Patient Satisfaction and Preferences: Colonoscopy or Computed Tomography Colonography for Colorectal Cancer Screening (Abstract #445) Patients in a recent study were more satisfied with colonoscopy than computed tomography colonography (CTC), even though CTC is less invasive and takes less time than colonoscopy, according to new research from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Patient satisfaction is believed to be an important factor in determining uptake and compliance with any screening test, so investigators sought to compare patient satisfaction following both CTC and colonoscopy. Researchers led by Greg Rosenfeld, MD, at the University of British Columbia, conducted a study comparing same-day CTC and colonoscopy among 90 subjects aged 50 and older who were at average risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Overall, patients felt that colonoscopy was more satisfactory they were less anxious with colonoscopy than with CTC and reported that, although their pain was adequately controlled in both procedures, there was less pain during colonoscopy. Typically, a colonoscopy is approximately 30 minutes and a CTC is five to 10 minutes in duration. Dr. Rosenfeld said researchers were surprised by the findings. Investigators expected patients to prefer CTC due to its shorter duration, minimal discomfort and the lack of requirement for sedation; patients were not restricted from activities such as driving after CTC, as is necessary after a colonoscopy performed under sedation.

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Bowel Cancer: Prevention And How To Spot The Symptoms

Eat Chocolate (Maybe) The Daily Mail reported on a study in mice, published in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, showing that rats exposed to a carcinogen developed fewer colon cancer lesions than rats if they consumed high-cocoa diets. “Being exposed to different poisons in the diet like toxins, mutagens and procarcinogens, the intestinal mucus is very susceptible to pathologies,” study researcher Maria Angeles Martin Arribas, a researcher at the Institute of Food Science and Technology and Nutrition, said in a statement. “Foods like cocoa, which is rich in polyphenols, seems to play an important role in protecting against disease.” However, it’s important to note that this effect was tested only on mice. Consume Ginger Root Research published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research showed that taking 2 grams of ginger root supplement every day might have colon cancer-preventing powers. The researchers from the University of Michigan Medical School found that taking ginger root supplements helped to minimize signs of inflammation of the colon, which has been connected to colon cancer. Go To A Classical Music-Loving Doctor A study from the University of Texas Health Science Center showed that doctors who conduct colonoscopies while listening to Mozart are more likely to find polyps, which can lead to colon cancer, ABC News reported. The study showed that polyp-detection increased to 36.7 percent from 27.16 percent when the doctors listened to Mozart. Exercise Regularly A study in the journal Cancer Causes & Control showed that people who exercise or play sports five or more times a week can lower their risk of developing colorectal cancer, compared with those who don’t exercise regularly (or at all), Johns Hopkins University reported.

Why exercise might reduce colon cancer risk isn’t well understood. It may be because exercise enhances the immune system or because it reduces levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factors, all of which have been associated with colon cancer risk.

Eat Your Veggies A number of studies have linked the consumption of cruciferous vegetables with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer, Oregon State University reported, though the effect may depend on a person’s genetic risk. In particular, a study published in 2000 in the American Journal of Epidemiology, showed that people who ate the most cruciferous veggies in a day (about 58 grams per day, on average) had a lower risk of colon cancer compared with people who ate the fewest cruciferous veggies in a day (about 11 grams per day, on average), Oregon State University reported. Enjoy Some Berries (Maybe) A study in mice showed that compounds called anthocyanins, found in black raspberries, seem to have powers at anti-colorectal cancer powers, MyHealthNewsDaily reported. The berries may help to prevent cancer because of their “high antioxidant activity,” study researcher Gary Stoner, of the College of Medicine at Ohio State University, told MyHealthNewsDaily; those antioxidants work to fight against DNA-damaging free radicals in the body. How to Reduce Your Risk of Colorectal Cancer The Doctors and USA Weekend share tips for reducing your risk of colorectal cancer.

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Patient Comments: Colon Cancer – Symptoms

Symptom Checker: Your Guide to Symptoms & Signs: Pinpoint Your Pain

This time she scheduled me for a colonoscopy , and I was found to have stage 4 colon cancer . I had surgery and 9 months of Folfiri. Was this comment helpful? I had four blood transfusions. Then I developed an ulcer with severe knifing abdominal pain and was experiencing constipation . Finally, blood showed up in one of my bowel movements. I was too weak to call my doctor. I had always checked my stools because I’m from a family of three generations of colon cancer survivors. I left the stool in the toilet overnight and the blood diffused into the water. That’s when I called my doctor.AI was diagnosed with high stage 2a cancer that had not metastasized. I was told the cancer had been in me for about a year. I had two large tumors located on both sides of the transverse and lost my entire large colon, but I have no colostomy bag. I wasn’t heavy to begin with, I left the hospital at 98 lbs.

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Bowel cancer treatment: reduce the risks

bowel cancer

Bowel cancer treatment: reduce the risks Bowel cancer (also known as colorectal cancer ) is the second largest cause of cancer deaths in the UK. It’s also one of the most difficult to talk about – but if diagnosed early it can be cured. Here’s how you can reduce the risk of getting it. This article on the prevention, symptomsand treatment of bowel cancer is written by Sarah Dawson , a freelance journalist who writes for national and international newspapers, magazines and websites. For many of us talking about anything to do with the bowels can be a very delicate matter. However, according to the Department of Health, bowel cancer affects more than one in 20 people, which is reason enough to overcome the embarrassment. The bowel is a long muscular tube that starts at the end of the stomach and extends all the way to the anus. Bowel Cancer (also known as colorectal cancer ) is cancer of the colon or rectum, arising from the cells that line the bowel. Most bowel cancers occur in the large intestine (the colon) with around 20 per cent occurring in the rectum. Cancer develops when one of the cells in the colon develops a series of changes – or mutations – in genes which control how the cell divides and survives. This causes the cell to split and form a clump of malignant (cancerous) cells. Bowel cancer affects men and women and is most common in people aged over 55, though younger people can still be at risk. In the UK, the NHS report bowel cancer to be the third most common cancer in men, and the second most common cancer in women. There are various lifestyle factors which can make you more at risk of bowel cancer, for example, not getting any physical exercise and eating an unhealthy diet high in fat and low in vegetables. But people who have suffered with an inflammatory bowel disease like Crohns or ulcerative colitis, or who have had previous polyps removed are also considered high risk. Unfortunately, having a family history of bowel cancer also places you in the higher risk category, but the earlier the cancer is diagnosed the greater the chance of cure. Prevention is better than cure It’s thought that 90 per cent of bowel cancer cases are due to dietary factors with the remaining 10 per cent being down to genetic/inherited factors so it goes without saying that paying good attention to what you eat and how you live your life is an essential form of preventative medicine. Studies indicate that people who eat lots of high-fibre foods have a low risk of bowel cancer. This is because dietary fibre (roughage) helps bulk the motions and speeds the passage of waste through the digestive system.Vegetable fibre is believed to be more protective than cereal fibre so make sure you include green vegetables like cabbage, broccoli, brussel sprouts and cauliflower in your meals as these veggies have chemicals which are thought to be very protective against cancer. Eating plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables helps the colon empty itself frequently and easily and the health department’s “five a day” programme recommends five portions of fresh fruit and vegetables per day, whether fresh, frozen, canned or dried. One portion is a large piece of fruit, like an apple or banana, or three heaped tablespoons of vegetables, one glass of fruit or vegetable juice and beans and pulses (baked beans or lentils). Avoid eating an excessive amount of calories to prevent becoming overweight. A diet low in animal and dairy fats will help reduce the risk of developing bowel cancer so quit the fry-up’s, cut back on fat-drenched foods like chocolate, biscuits and cakes and reduce your alcohol intake. A high intake of red meat is also not advisable. Drinking lots of fluids like herbal teas and water is recommended to lower your chances of bowel cancer because water assists the transit of waste products through the colon and keeps motions soft. Aim for two to three litres each day and minimise your Espressos, Cappucinos and teas as much as possible as caffeine ultimately has a negative effect on the body. Taking regular exercise to keep fit and healthy is important for good bowel health, and just 20 minutes of moderate daily exercise helps to ease the passage of waste through the system. Finally, learn to become familiar with your bowel habits so that you notice if/when any changes occur.

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Colon Polyp Return Likelier In Men

Men, in particular, never like going for the procedure. Women need to encourage their men to go, he says After age 65, your risk really takes off, so it shows the importance of having colonoscopies as we age, Laiyemo says. And since obesity is a risk factor as well, it offers another reason to get those extra pounds off. Session moderator Alan Kristal, DrPH, of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, agrees. Colonoscopy is one of our most powerful tools for prevention because by having polyps removed, you can prevent cancer. This offers a nice overall package of factors that affect risk, telling us who should be targeted for surveillance, he tells WebMD. Men, Older People at Increased Risk For the study, the researchers analyzed data from nearly 2,000 participants in the Polyp Prevention Trial, designed to assess the impact of a low-fat, high-fiber diet on polyp recurrence. All the participants had at least one polyp removed before they started following the low-fat diet mandated in the study. Over the next four years, 524 of the participants developed new polyps. Results showed that: People who had multiple polyps removed the first time around were 2.5 times more likely to have a recurrence than those who had one polyp removed. Men were 76% more likely to have a recurrence than women. People aged 65 to 69 were at 87% increased risk compared with younger adults; those aged 70 to 74 had four times the risk of younger adults.

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Obesity in men could dictate future colon screenings

4, 2014 Obesity in men could dictate future colon screenings Contact(s): Sarina Gleason Media Communications office: (517) 355-9742 sarina.gleason@cabs.msu.edu , Jenifer Fenton Food Science and Human Nutrition office: (517) 355-8474 imigjeni@msu.edu Obesity is a known risk factor for many cancers including colon cancer, yet the reasons behind the colon cancer link have often remained unclear. A Michigan State University study is shedding more light on the topic and has shown that elevated leptin a fat hormone higher body mass index and a larger waistline in men is associated with a greater likelihood of having colorectal polyps, precancerous growths linked to colon cancer. The result may put men at an even greater risk of the disease and also may mean their body weight could eventually be a deciding factor in whether a colonoscopy is in their future. Today, age and family history typically dictate a screening. Jenifer Fenton, assistant professor and researcher in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, and Kari Hortos, associate dean in MSUs College of Osteopathic Medicine at the Macomb University Center, led the 18-month, cross-sectional study, which followed 126 healthy, white American males ranging from 48 to 65 years of age. Participants showed no signs or symptoms of health issues, yet underwent routine colonoscopies. What we found is 78 percent of the 126 men in the study were either overweight or obese based on their BMI or waist circumference. Of those, about 30 percent were found to have more than one polyp after colonoscopies were performed, said Fenton. In fact, the more obese participants were 6.5 times more likely to have three polyps compared to their thinner counterparts. Sarah Comstock, a co-author of the study and research fellow in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, also indicated that the significance of the research is twofold. Not only does it show the association that leptin and a higher BMI have with colon polyps, but it gives us a better snapshot on how body weight and other factors may actually help us determine who might be at a higher risk of developing polyps, she said. With obesity rates climbing during the past 20 years within the United States and colon cancer being the second-leading killer of men and women in the nation, these facts compelled Fenton and her team to conduct research which could identify the specific biomarkers of obesity and early-stage colon cancer and help in prevention efforts. Previous research published by Fenton in 2009 identified the connection between obesity and colon cancer through examining tissue hormones. These studies demonstrated that, at higher levels, leptin worked as a primary mechanism in inducing precancerous colon cells by increasing the blood supply to them and promoting their progression. Even with all of our research, theres still more to be done, particularly in larger, more diverse populations, before any changes in screening recommendations can be made, said Fenton. But weve definitely got a good start. The study was recently published in the online journal PLOS ONE . The research was funded by the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health and the MSU Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.

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Obesity Could Be Best Guideline for Colon Cancer Screening in Men

Current guidelines for colon cancer say regular screening should begin at age 50 and continue through age 75. A new study, however, says at least for men obesity may be a better guide to which men should be tested. The Michigan State University study has shown that elevated leptin a fat hormone higher body mass index and a larger waistline in men is associated with a greater likelihood of having colorectal polyps, precancerous growths linked to colon cancer. > Today’s Headlines The result may put men at an even greater risk of the disease and also may mean their body weight could eventually be a deciding factor in whether a colonoscopy is in their future. Today, age and family history typically dictate a screening. Jenifer Fenton, assistant professor and researcher in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, and Kari Hortos, associate dean in MSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine at the Macomb University Center, led the 18-month, cross-sectional study, which followed 126 healthy, white American males ranging from 48 to 65 years of age. Participants showed no signs or symptoms of health issues, yet underwent routine colonoscopies. “What we found is 78 percent of the 126 men in the study were either overweight or obese based on their BMI or waist circumference. Of those, about 30 percent were found to have more than one polyp after colonoscopies were performed,” said Fenton. “In fact, the more obese participants were 6.5 times more likely to have three polyps compared to their thinner counterparts.” Sarah Comstock, a co-author of the study and research fellow in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, also indicated that the significance of the research is twofold. “Not only does it show the association that leptin and a higher BMI have with colon polyps, but it gives us a better snapshot on how body weight and other factors may actually help us determine who might be at a higher risk of developing polyps,” she said. With obesity rates climbing during the past 20 years within the United States and colon cancer being the second-leading killer of men and women in the nation, these facts compelled Fenton and her team to conduct research which could identify the specific biomarkers of obesity and early-stage colon cancer and help in prevention efforts. Previous research published by Fenton in 2009 identified the connection between obesity and colon cancer through examining tissue hormones. These studies demonstrated that, at higher levels, leptin worked as a primary mechanism in inducing precancerous colon cells by increasing the blood supply to them and promoting their progression. “Even with all of our research, there’s still more to be done, particularly in larger, more diverse populations, before any changes in screening recommendations can be made,” said Fenton. “But we’ve definitely got a good start.” The study was recently published in the online journal PLOS ONE.

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Studies Confirm Colon Cancer Screening Reduces Deaths

If blood is found, a colonoscopy is done to look for cancer or remove suspicious growths. For its evaluation of the blood test, a team led by Dr. Aasma Shaukat of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis looked at records from 46,551 participants in the Minnesota Colon Cancer Control Study who were followed for 30 years. People were either screened for fecal blood annually, every two years or not at all. However, the formal screening program only spanned two six-year windows. The researchers had no follow-up information on which patients received subsequent screening with the blood test or a colonoscopy. Nonetheless, the people who received annual screening during those initial periods ultimately saw a 32 percent reduction in their risk of dying from colorectal cancer. With biennial screening, the risk was cut by 22 percent. Screening did not affect the overall risk of dying during that period. In total, 732 of 33,020 deaths over the 30 years were from colorectal cancer. “You would expect to see a decrease in the risk of dying of colon cancer in the first eight to 10 years. The fact that the effect was sustained through 30 years is actually fairly remarkable,” said Shaukat. “It shows that the effect of colon cancer screening is profound,” she said. “The study of fecal occult blood testing provides the longest follow-up of any colorectal cancer screening study to date – an impressive 30 years – and shows that the benefits of screening by this method endure for the lifetime of the patient,” Enders told Reuters Health in an email.

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Colon cancer screening saves lives, but more need to do it

He has stage 3C cancer, which was through the wall of the colon, with malignant lymph nodes, and has spread to the mesenteric area. I sincerely hope that “MD” does not stand for medical doctor, because you might be the primary care doctor who was just giving my husband anti-spasmodic drugs for his “irritable bowel syndrome.” July 6, 2011 at 22:51 | Report abuse | Margaret And what happens if they find blood? Is the doctor going to volunteer to go to the next procedure? If you don’t have the money what then? Pray and eat a lot of fiber? July 7, 2011 at 02:13 | Report abuse | Chetan No mention of comparison for FOBT (Fecal Occult Blood Test) Vs. Colonoscopy in reducing mortality. I understand that Colonoscopy is better than FOBT but it is interesting to see how much difference colonoscopy does make ! July 5, 2011 at 21:39 | Report abuse | Reply JM When you have no personal insurance, and your job offers no inurance, and you are 62, fat chance on being able to afford a colonoscopy. Scare us all you want, and we understand, but until there is a national health care coverage, or a way to get truly affordable colonoscopies, many will die because of NO coverage. Amen…. July 5, 2011 at 21:51 | Report abuse | Reply Elizabeth Which is why most Americans (over 70 percent) wanted universal health care not tied to their job, but some people (probably those who do not want new business start-ups) wanted health insurance to remain the way it has been, and called anything else socialist or communist. Think people. The advertising budget for those insurance companies is astronomical. July 6, 2011 at 22:54 | Report abuse | beth I certainly understand the importance of have a colonscopy screening…since i lost my health insurance I cannot afford one…does anyone know of any organzation that i might get help from to assist me in paying for one.

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This Pill Camera Just Got Approved By The Fda To Look At Your Colon

Colon Polyps – Treatment Overview

While Given’s wireless, image-beaming system may sound like science fiction, it’s actually more than a decade old. In 2001, the company received FDA approval for a similar device used to get a close-up view of the small intestine. At that time, analysts expected Given’s approach to grow into a direct competitor to traditional colonoscopy. But company studies found that images taken by the mini-camera were not quite as clear as those from the in-office procedure. As a result, the company has pursued a more limited market for its device: patients who have trouble undergoing standard colonoscopies. The FDA on Monday cleared the company’s PillCam Colon for patients who have experienced an incomplete colonoscopy. Given estimates 750,000 U.S. patients are not able to complete the procedure each year, due to anatomy issues, previous surgery or various colon diseases. Even with this limited indication, analysts estimate the new pillcam could grow to sales of over $60 million in North America by 2019, with room for expansion as the technology improves. MorningStar analyst Debbie Wang said the company has shrewdly positioned the device as another tool in the gastrointestinal specialist’s kit, rather than a direct competitor. “Given’s management understands that the traditional colonoscopy is the gastroenterologist’s bread and butter right now,” Wang said. “So they didn’t want to do anything that would position this as a substitute.” Wang notes that Given’s PillCam costs $500, significantly less than the roughly $4,000 rate for colonoscopy. Eventually, she thinks doctors may use the device to attract adults who avoid regular screenings due to fears of pain, embarrassment and general discomfort. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidelines currently recommend regular colonoscopies beginning at age 50 and continuing through age 75, though most U.S.

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Initial treatment If adenomatous polyps are found during an exam with flexible sigmoidoscopy , a colonoscopy will be done to look for and remove any polyps in the rest of the colon . The bigger a colon polyp is, especially if it is larger than 1 cm (0.4 in.), the more likely it is that the polyp will be adenomatous or contain cancer cells and need to be removed. In some cases, very small polyps [5 mm (0.2 in.) or less] may not be removed. Some studies have concluded that even if they contain adenomatous tissue, these polyps take so many years to grow that they pose little risk of cancer, except in people who have inherited (familial) polyp syndromes. 1 Most colon polyps are not likely to develop into cancer. If only hyperplastic polyps are found during your flexible sigmoidoscopy, you likely do not need to have a colonoscopy. These polyps do not become cancerous. In this case you can continue your regular screenings, unless you are at an increased risk for colon cancer because of a family history of colon cancer or an inherited polyp syndrome. Risks of removing polyps during colonoscopy Complications from colonoscopy are rare. There is a slight risk of: Puncturing the colon (less than 1 in 1,000) or causing severe bleeding by damaging the wall of the colon (less than 3 in 1,000). Bleeding caused by removing a polyp. Complications from sedatives given during the procedure. Ongoing treatment Regular screenings for colon polyps are the best way to prevent polyps from developing into colon cancer. Most colon polyps can be identified and removed during a colonoscopy.

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